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October, 2008
Ahmadiyah Mosque at Cianjur vandalised by radical group. Outer walls/Windows scribbled with spray paint which reads 'Sealed by Muslims'        
June, 2008
Muslim protesters shout 'God is great' during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, outside the presidential palace in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, June 20, 2008. Hundreds of demonstrators staged the rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. Muslim protesters shout 'God is great' during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, outside the presidential palace in Medan, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Friday, June 20, 2008. Hundreds of demonstrators staged the rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. Muslim protesters rally during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 18, 2008. Thousands of demonstrators staged a rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. Protesters take part in a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. Protesters carry a placards that read "disband Ahmadiyya" during a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam.
Muslim protesters shout slogans during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 18, 2008. Thousands of demonstrators staged a rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. A child holds a placard that reads "disband Ahmadiyya" during a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. Police stand as protesters shout slogans during a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. Muslim women attend a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. Muslims take part in a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta on June 18. Thousands of Indonesians Muslim wearing white to show their religious piety rallied to demand the banning of a minority Islamic Ahmadiyah sect deemed "deviant" by top clerics.
Muslims take part in a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta on June 18. Thousands of Indonesians Muslim wearing white to show their religious piety rallied to demand the banning of a minority Islamic Ahmadiyah sect deemed 'deviant' by top clerics. Muslims shout slogans during a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta on June 18. Thousands of Indonesians Muslim wearing white to show their religious piety rallied to demand the banning of a minority Islamic Ahmadiyah sect deemed 'deviant' by top clerics. Protesters carry placards that read 'disband Ahmadiyya' during a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. The raised hands of protesters are seen among the flags of Indonesian hardline Islamic groups during a demonstration calling for the banning of the Ahmadiyya sect in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 18, 2008. Thousands of Indonesian Muslims dressed in white rallied outside the presidential palace in Jakarta on Wednesday to press the government to ban the Ahmadiyya sect, regarded as heretical by many followers of Islam. Indonesian members of hardline Islamic groups pray during a demonstration calling for the outlawing of Ahmadiyah, an Islamic sect deemed by the hardline groups to be a heretical form of Islam Wednesday June 18, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. The government issued a decree last week ordering Ahmadiyah to stop spreading its beliefs, but stopped short of a ban.
Indonesian members of a hard line Islamic group hold a poster of Rizieq Shihab, the jailed leader of the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI) during a demonstration calling for the outlawing of Ahmadiyah, an Islamic sect deemed by the hard line groups to be a heretical form of Islam Wednesday June 18, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. The government issued a decree last week ordering Ahmadiyah to stop spreading its beliefs, but stopped short of a ban. Thousands of members of Indonesian hard line Islamic groups attend a demonstration calling for the outlawing of Ahmadiyah, an Islamic sect deemed by the hardline groups to be a heretical form of Islam Wednesday June 18, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. The government issued a decree last week ordering Ahmadiyah to stop spreading its beliefs, but stopped short of a ban. Muslim protesters wave flags during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, outside the presidential palace in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 18, 2008. Thousands of demonstrators staged the rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. Muslim protesters pray during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect which recognizes an Indian prophet, Mirza Gulam Ahmad, in addition to Prophet Muhammad, outside the presidential palace in Jakarta, Indonesia, Wednesday, June 18, 2008. Thousands of demonstrators staged the rally to call for the banning of the sect that has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical. Members of the Islamic Defender Front (FPI), a hardline Indonesian Muslim group, take part in rally calling for the government to ban the Ahmadiyya religion in Medan, North Sumatra province, June 13, 2008. Indonesia's resolve to defend freedom of belief, its constitution protects freedom of religion, has been put to the test over Ahmadiyya. The religion's mosques and sympathisers have been attacked by violent militant groups such as the FPI, and they are under pressure to say they are not Muslim. Indonesia's top Muslim religious council has declared Ahmadiyya a deviant sect, and hardline groups want them banned.
A boy shouts 'God is great' during a rally against the Ahmadiyya religion in Makassar, South Sulawesi province, June 13, 2008. Indonesia's resolve to defend freedom of belief, its constitution protects freedom of religion, has been put to the test over Ahmadiyya. The religion's mosques and sympathisers have been attacked by violent militant groups, and they are under pressure to say they are not Muslim. Indonesia's top Muslim religious council has declared Ahmadiyya a deviant sect, and hardline groups want them banned. A girl carries a poster showing followers of the Ahmadiyya religion during a rally calling for the government to ban the religion in Medan, North Sumatra province, June 13, 2008. Indonesia's resolve to defend freedom of belief, its constitution protects freedom of religion, has been put to the test over Ahmadiyya. The religion's mosques and sympathisers have been attacked by violent militant groups, and they are under pressure to say they are not Muslim. Indonesia's top Muslim religious council has declared Ahmadiyya a deviant sect, and hardline groups want them banned. Muslim activists rally against the Ahmadiyya religion in Makassar, South Sulawesi province, June 13, 2008. Indonesia's resolve to defend freedom of belief, its constitution protects freedom of religion, has been put to the test over Ahmadiyya. The religion's mosques and sympathisers have been attacked by violent militant groups, and they are under pressure to say they are not Muslim. Indonesia's top Muslim religious council has declared Ahmadiyya a deviant sect, and hardline groups want them banned. A member of the Islamic Defender Front (FPI), a hardline Indonesian Muslim group, takes part in rally calling for the government to ban the Ahmadiyya religion in Medan, North Sumatra province, June 13, 2008. Indonesia's resolve to defend freedom of belief, its constitution protects freedom of religion, has been put to the test over Ahmadiyya. The religion's mosques and sympathisers have been attacked by violent militant groups such as the FPI, and they are under pressure to say they are not Muslim. Indonesia's top Muslim religious council has declared Ahmadiyya a deviant sect, and hardline groups want them banned. A Muslim protestor displays a placard demanding a ban on the Ahmadiyah sect in Jakarta on June 9. Thousands of Indonesians wearing white to show their religious piety rallied at the presidential palace here Wednesday to demand the banning of a minority Islamic sect deemed 'deviant' by top clerics.
A Muslim woman displays a poster of detained hardline Muslim cleric Rizieq Shihab during 8a demonstration demanding for a ban on the Ahmadiyah sect in Jakarta on June 9, 2008. Liberal Indonesians accused the government of caving in to extremists Tuesday after it issued a quasi-ban against a minority Islamic sect in the face of violent protests by Muslim hardliners. Muslim protestors display a banner demanding a ban on the Ahmadiyah sect during a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta. The Indonesian government has announced tough restrictions against a minority Muslim sect as thousands of angry hardliners called for jihad, or holy war, against the group. A hardline Muslim protester carries a poster featuring a struck out portrait of Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who the Ahmadiyya sect believe is Islam's final prophet after Muhammad, during a rally outside the presidential palace in Jakarta June 9, 2008. The protesters urged the president to disband the Ahmadiyya sect branded by many Muslims as 'deviant'. Members of various hard line Islamic shout during a demonstration calling for an Islamic sect, known as Ahmadiyah, to be disbanded Monday, June 9, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. More than 5,000 demonstrators gathered outside Indonesia's presidential palace to demand that the government outlaw the moderate Muslim sect they consider heretical. Thousands of members of hardline Islamic groups march to Jakarta's Police Headquarters during a demonstration calling for an Islamic sect, known as Ahmadiyah, to be disbanded Monday, June 9, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. More than 5,000 demonstrators gathered to demand that the government outlaw the moderate Muslim sect they consider heretical.
Thousands of hardline Indonesian Muslims chant 'God is Great' during a rally in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 9, 2008. The protesters urged the president to disband the Ahmadiyya sect branded by many Muslims as 'deviant'. Thousands of hardline Indonesian Muslims chant 'God is Great' during a rally in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 9, 2008. The protesters urged the president to disband the Ahmadiyya sect branded by many Muslim as 'deviant'. Thousands of hardline Indonesian Muslims chant 'God is Great' during a rally in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta June 9, 2008. The protesters urged the president to disband the Ahmadiyya sect branded by many Muslim as 'deviant'. Members of various hardline Islamic groups confront police guarding the presidential palace during a demonstration calling for an Islamic sect, known as Ahmadiyah, to be disbanded Monday, June 9, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. More than 5,000 demonstrators gathered to demand that the government outlaw the moderate Muslim sect they consider heretical.  
May, 2008
Police guard a mosque that belongs to Ahmadiyah sect of Muslim in Ciaruteun, Bogor, on May 6, 2008. A push by hardline Islamists for Indonesia to ban a 'deviant' Muslim sect has ignited a battle for the soul of the world's largest Muslim-majority country. A policeman guards a gutted mosque belonging to Ahmadiyah Muslim sect in Sukabumi, Bogor on May 6, 2008. A push by hardline Islamists for Indonesia to ban a 'deviant' Muslim sect has ignited a battle for the soul of the world's largest Muslim-majority country. Followers of Ahmadiyah Muslim sect prepare food for their community in Ciaruteun, Bogor on May 6, 2008. A push by hardline Islamists for Indonesia to ban a 'deviant' Muslim sect has ignited a battle for the soul of the world's largest Muslim-majority country. Followers of Ahmadiyah Muslim sect leave their mosque after offering prayer in Ciaruteun, Bogor, on May 6, 2008. A push by hardline Islamists for Indonesia to ban a 'deviant' Muslim sect has ignited a battle for the soul of the world's largest Muslim-majority country. A boy sits next to a gutted mosque belonging to Ahmadiyah Muslim sect in Sukabumi, Bogor on May 6, 2008. A push by hardline Islamists for Indonesia to ban a 'deviant' Muslim sect has ignited a battle for the soul of the world's largest Muslim-majority country.
Ahmadiyya supporters rally demanding the government cancel its plan to outlaw Ahmadiyya in Jakarta May 6, 2008. Indonesian Muslim clerics warned on Tuesday that the country would face religious conflict if the government delays a ban on the Islamic sect deemed 'heretical' by mainstream Islamic authorities. About 300 Ahmadiyya supporters from Moderate Muslim group rally in Jakarta May 06, 2008, demanding for the government to cancel its plan to outlaw the Muslim sect. About 300 Ahmadiyya supporters from Moderate Muslim group rally in Jakarta May 06, 2008, demanding for the government to cancel its plan to outlaw the Muslim sect. The sign reads, 'Save our nation save Ahmaiyya'. Radical Muslim cleric Abu Bakar Bashir speaks to journalists in Jakarta May 06, 2008. Indonesia, the country with the most Muslims, could face religious conflict if the government does not push ahead with plans to ban the Islamic sect Ahmadiyya, a group of hard-line Muslim clerics warned on Tuesday. Radical Muslim cleric Abu Bakar Bashir speaks to journalists in Jakarta May 06, 2008. Indonesia, the country with the most Muslims, could face religious conflict if the government does not push ahead with plans to ban the Islamic sect Ahmadiyya, a group of hard-line Muslim clerics warned on Tuesday.
Indonesian human rights activists march during a demonstration against the possible ban on Ahmadiyya, an Islamic sect founded at the end of the 19th century in Pakistan, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Tuesday, May 06, 2008. The sect has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical for its belief that there was a prophet after Muhammad, Hadhrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who died in 1908. Protesters display posters during a demonstration against the possible ban on Ahmadiyya, an Islamic sect founded at the end of the 19th century in Pakistan, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Tuesday, May 06, 2008. The sect has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical for its belief that there was a prophet after Muhammad, Hadhrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who died in 1908. Indonesian human rights activists shout slogans during a demonstration against the possible ban on Ahmadiyya, an Islamic sect founded at the end of the 19th century in Pakistan, in Jakarta, Indonesia, Tuesday, May 06, 2008. The sect has come under attack from hard-liners as heretical for its belief that there was a prophet after Muhammad, Hadhrat Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, who died in 1908. A member of Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect, pray at a small private mosque in a Jakarta neighborhood Tuesday May 6, 2008. Arson attacks carried out by an extremist fringe on several Ahmadiyah mosques in April has some moderate Muslims in Indonesia saying it indicates the erosion of long-held traditions of religious freedom and secularism in the world's most populous Muslim country. Indonesian members of Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect, pray at a small private mosque in a Jakarta neighborhood Tuesday May 06, 2008. Arson attacks carried out by an extremist fringe on several Ahmadiyah mosques in April has some moderate Muslims in Indonesia saying it indicates the erosion of long-held traditions of religious freedom and secularism in the world's most populous Muslim country.
Members of the hardline Muslim group Front Pembela Islam (FPI) or Islamic Front Defenders Indonesian members of a hardline Islamic group demonstrate against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect, that is praying at a small private mosque in a Jakarta neighborhood Tuesday May 06, 2008. Arson attacks carried out by an extremist fringe on several Ahmadiyah mosques in April has some moderate Muslims in Indonesia saying it indicates the erosion of long-held traditions of religious freedom and secularism in the world's most populous Muslim country. Thousands of members of a hard line Islamic group shout during a demonstration against Ahmadiyah, a Muslim sect, pray at a small private mosque in a Jakarta neighborhood Tuesday May 06, 2008. Arson attacks carried out by an extremist fringe on several Ahmadiyah mosques in April has some moderate Muslims in Indonesia saying it indicates the erosion of long-held traditions of religious freedom and secularism in the world's most populous Muslim country. 8Indonesian members Ahmadiyah, an Islamic sect demonstrate for religious freedom as the government considers a ban on Ahmadiyah Thursday May 08, 2008 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Arson attacks carried out by an extremist fringe on several Ahmadiyah mosques in April has some moderate Muslims in Indonesia saying it indicates the erosion of long-held traditions of religious freedom and secularism in the world's most populous Muslim country. Indonesian members of Muslim of Laskar Islam run during a rally in Jakarta on May 15, 2008 against Ahmadiyah, a 'deviant' MusIim sect and urged the Indonesian government to ban the sect
April, 2008
Protesters take part in a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidentiaI palace in Jakarta. April 20,2008 A Muslim man shouts 'Allahu Akbar (God is great)' during a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta April 20, 2008. More than 1,000 Indonesian Muslims gathered in front of the presidential palace on Sunday to press the government to ban Ahmadiyya, a sect that has been branded heretical by most Muslims. The posters read, 'Disband Ahmadiyya'. Protesters take part in a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta April 20, 2008. More than 1,000 Indonesian Muslims gathered in front of the presidential palace on Sunday to press the government to ban Ahmadiyya, a sect that has been branded heretical by most Muslims. The posters read, 'Disband Ahmadiyya'; the man's headband reads, 'Reject and disband Ahmadiyya now'. Students take part in a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta April 20, 2008. More than 1,000 Indonesian Muslims gathered in front of the presidential palace on Sunday to press the government to ban Ahmadiyya, a sect that has been branded heretical by most Muslims. The posters read, 'Disband Ahmadiyya'. A Muslim woman stands in front of protesters during a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta April 20, 2008. More than 1,000 Indonesian Muslims gathered in front of the presidential palace on Sunday to press the government to ban Ahmadiyya, a sect that has been branded heretical by most Muslims. The posters read, 'Disband Ahmadiyya'.
A Muslim protester holds a poster that reads,'If Ahmadiyah is not forbidden, we fight' during a protest in Jakarta, in January. About 1,000 Indonesian Muslims demonstrated outside the presidential palace on Sunday demanding Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono issue a decree disbanding the 'deviant' Islamic group. Muslim women carry posters during a demonstration against the Muslim sect Ahmadiyya in front of the presidential palace in Jakarta April 20, 2008. More than 1,000 Indonesian Muslims gathered in front of the presidential palace on Sunday to press the government to ban Ahmadiyya, a sect that has been branded heretical by most Muslims. The posters read, 'Disband Ahmadiyya'. */ ?>

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