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Home U.S. Department of State Annual Report 2006
Indonesia: Human Rights Practices, 2006

Excerpts from
U.S. Department of State
Country Reports on Human Rights Practices - 2006
Released by the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, March 6, 2007
Indonesia
The government generally has been unable to adequately address serious human rights abuses committed in the past. Inadequate resources, weak leadership, and limited accountability contributed to continued abuses by security force personnel, although with sharply reduced frequency and gravity than under past governments. The following human rights problems occurred during the year: unlawful killings by security force personnel, terrorists, vigilante groups, and mobs; torture; harsh prison conditions; arbitrary detentions; a corrupt judicial system; warrantless searches; infringements on free speech; restrictions on peaceful assembly; interference with freedom of religion by private parties, sometimes with complicity of local officials; intercommunal religious violence; violence and sexual abuse against women and children; trafficking in persons; failure to enforce labor standards and violations of worker rights, including forced child labor.

RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS

Section 2
Respect for Civil Liberties, Including:

b. Freedom of Peaceful Assembly and Association

Freedom of Assembly

On other occasions police took no action to protect persons being attacked by mobs. On February 4, a mob in West Lombok attacked the houses of Ahmadiyah sect members, destroying 27 houses and leaving 137 people homeless. On March 17, a mob in Central Lombok attacked another Ahmadiyah settlement, destroying 45 homes. In each incident, police received information that an attack was imminent, but took no action to prevent it. In July a mob ransacked an Ahmadiyah mosque in Bogor, West Java (see section 2.c.).

c. Freedom of Religion

Societal Abuses and Discrimination

The Ahmadiyah Islamic sect, considered heretical by many mainstream Muslims, was attacked by mobs on several occasions, sometimes with elements of the authorities assisting the attackers or acquiescing in the attack. The government has not sought to punish the perpetrators of these attacks (see section 2.b.). At year’s end the Ahmadiyah compound in Bogor, West Java, which was attacked and damaged in July 2005, remained sealed, although Ahmadiyah members were able to use the office facilities in a limited fashion.

On February 4, between 500 and 1,000 local residents attacked an Ahmadiyah housing complex in Gegerungan, injuring six persons and destroying all 25 homes. The 137 residents were forced to take shelter in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp in Mataram, the Lombok provincial capital. The village head informed police of the impending attack but the police were unable or unwilling to stop the violence. Police arrested three participants in the violence after the situation calmed, but they were subsequently released and no further action was taken. An alleged provocateur of the violence was also later arrested, but was released when an angry crowd showed up at the police station holding him. No one has been charged with any crime in the incident.

On March 17, members of the Anti-Ahmadiyah Alliance destroyed homes of Ahmadiyah members in Prapen, Central Lombok Regency, causing the evacuation of 45 people to the Ahmadiyah IDP camp in Mataram. There were no arrests after this attack.

At year’s end 182 Ahmadiyah members were living as IDPs in government barracks in Mataram. Police would not allow them to return and rebuild their homes until the local government decided what to do about them. Local political and religious leaders blamed the Ahmadiyah’s plight on their unwillingness to “return to the flock” of mainstream Islam.

On February 15, the Regent of Bulukumba closed the Ahmadiyah mosque in Ujung Loe district of Bulukumba Regency, South Sulawesi. Hundreds of persons demanded that Ahmadiyah followers leave the village.

On April 29, dozens of unidentified people vandalized the Ahmadiyah mosque in Ranowila, South Sulawesi Province, while Ahmadiyah followers were commemorating the Prophet Mohammad’s birthday. No injuries or arrests were reported.

On October 24, a group attacked a mosque belonging to the Ahmadiyah sect in Buton regency, South Sulawesi, while the group was performing Idul Fitri prayers. Buton police prevented the attackers from setting the mosque on fire and evacuated members of the sect. No arrests were made.

On October 25, followers of Ahmadiyah clashed with local community members in Manislor, West Java, causing damage to the Ahmadiyah mosque and the house of a local resident. No arrests were made.

For a more detailed discussion, see the 2006 International Religious Freedom Report.


Related : See Indonesia Section.
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