http://www.ThePersecution.org/ Religious Persecution of Ahmadiyya Muslim Community
Recommend UsEmail this PagePersecution News RSS feedeGazetteAlislam.org Blog
Introduction & Updates
<<… Indonesia >>
>> Papers & Analysis
Monthly Newsreports
Media Reports
Press Releases
Facts & Figures
Individual Case Reports
Pakistan and Ahmadis
Critical Analysis/Archives
Persecution - In Pictures
United Nations, HCHR
Amnesty International
H.R.C.P.
US States Department
USSD C.I.R.F
Urdu Section
Feedback/Site Tools
Related Links
Loading

By Muhammad Zafrulla Khan
This concisely written text presents the teachings of Islam and their distinct superiority over various Articles that make up the Declaration of Human Rights adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations and universally acclaimed as the greater charter of freedom. The author explains how 1400 years ago, Islam emancipated the poor and oppressed and gave the world the basic prescription for the respect and value of all human beings irrespective of class, colour or creed. Those instructions contained in the Holy Qur'an remain as relevant today as they were at the time that it was revealed. However, with the passage of time, some parts of Muslim society neglected Qur'anic teachings with an inevitable decline in moral standards. The author however concludes on an optimistic note that the revival of Islam is happening and with it a close adherence to the values laid out in the Holy Qur'an
US$7.00 [Order]

Home Worldwide Indonesia June, 2008 Indonesia tightens …
Indonesia tightens rules for sect
BBC Bews
Page last updated at 13:19 GMT, Monday, 9 June 2008 14:19 UK
Indonesia tightens rules for sect
Hardliners have mounted a sometimes violent anti-Ahmadiyah campaign
Hardliners have mounted a sometimes violent anti-Ahmadiyah campaign
The Indonesian government has announced tough restrictions on followers of the minority Ahmadiyah sect.

In the decree, the Ahmadiyah are warned they risk five years in jail if they do not stop spreading unorthodox beliefs and return to mainstream Islam.

The Indonesian constitution guarantees freedom of religion.

This latest move is widely seen as bowing to Islamic hardliners, who have stepped up a sometimes violent campaign against the nation’s 200,000 Ahmadiyah.

Last week dozens of pro-tolerance demonstrators were attacked by members of a militant Islamic group - and on Monday several thousand hardline Muslims again took to the streets in support of banning the sect.

The Ahmadiyah have views that are seen as controversial by mainstream Islamic society.

A widespread belief among sect members is that their founder, Mirza Ghulam Ahmad, was the final prophet of Islam - and not Muhammad.

’Deviant interpretation’

The religious affairs minister made the long-awaited announcement in a joint decree with the country’s interior minister and attorney general.

The text of the decree orders the sect to “stop spreading interpretations and activities which deviate from the principal teachings of Islam,” reported the news agency AFP.

Such activities included “the spreading of the belief that there is another prophet with his own teachings after Prophet Muhammad”.

There has been fierce debate in Indonesia over whether the country’s constitution allows the banning of religious practices, says the BBC’s Lucy Williamson in Jakarta.

The preamble to the decree insists that the decision is in line with Indonesia’s constitutional guarantees on freedom of religion, and with domestic and international laws on human rights, she says.

But many Indonesians are likely to disagree.

URL : http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7443915.stm
Top of page